LCRD

Linear Collider Research and Development Working Group

R&D Project Information and Status


Accelerator Physics, Luminosity/Energy/Polarization, Vertex detector, Tracking, Calorimetry, Muons/Particle ID.

2.1. Beam Halo Monitor
accelerator
FY 2003: $30,001
Lucien Cremaldi
cremaldi@phy.olemiss.edu
(662) 915-5311
Mississippi
  • 2/22/03: I spoke with Takashi Maruyama a bit in Dallas about the beam delivery Monte Carlo. Mark lead me to believe that there are a number of places along this line that halo monitors would be useful. In particular near columator jaws. This monitor would need to be radiation tolerant for reliaable use. Maybe diamond could ne used as a wand or in a small calorimeter format. LAr might be applicable??

    I am working with the Rutgers group on implementing a diamond based beam halo detector at he CMS experiment near the ip. They have the infrastructure and they would be happy to work with me.

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2.2. Beam Test Proposal of an Optical Diffraction Radiation Beam Size Monitor at the SLAC FFTB
accelerator
FY 2003: $46,000
Yasuo Fukui
fukui@slac.stanford.edu
(650) 926-2146
UCLA
SLAC
  • 2/24/03: The following is going on while waiting for the official approval of the sub-proposal through DOE, toward the completion of a design report of the beam test:
    1. simulate the following:
      • ODR/OTR photon simulation/calculation
      • background photon estimation/simulation
    2. designing a target slit
    3. plan a workshop to discuss plans and design options
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2.3. Design and Fabrication of a Radiation-Hard 500-MHz Digitizer Using Deep Submicron Technology
accelerator
FY 2003: $43,400
K.K. Gan
gan@mps.ohio-state.edu
(614) 292-4124
Ohio State
SLAC
  • 3/3/03: We have started the design of the high speed/resolution ADC, albeit at a low level due to funding uncertainty. We had a meeting last December with our SLAC collaborator, Steve Smith, to learn more about the requirements and discuss our plans. As a result of a literature search, we now have a basic architecture for the design and are starting the simulation.
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2.4. RF Beam Position Monitor for Measuring Beam Tilt
accelerator
FY 2003: $30,141
Yury Kolomensky
yury@slac.stanford.edu
(510) 486-7811
UC Berkeley
Berlin
LBNL
Notre Dame
SLAC
  • 2/22/03 [News from Yury]: We have started working (with Marc Ross et al at SLAC) on the beam tilt proposal, but so far this has been limited to modeling and other preparatory work by an undergrad and myself, which is about as much as I can get out my own grant. If there is some support that is now available, that would help.
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2.8. Machine Serviceable Electronics Standards
accelerator
FY 2003: $9,240
Michael Haney
m-haney@uiuc.edu
(217) 244-6425
Illinois
LBNL
Rice
  • 2/22/03: Funding for this project has not been sought, and no real progress has been made to date. While each of the principals have expressed interest, none have had sufficient resource to actively initiate this project.
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2.9. Radiation damage studies of materials and electronic devices using hadrons
accelerator
FY 2003: $19,180
David Pellett
pellett@physics.ucdavis.edu
(530) 752-1783
UC Davis
Fermilab
SLAC
  • -/-/03:
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2.11. Ground Motion studies versus depth
accelerator
FY 2003: $19,819
Mayda Velasco
mvelasco@lotus.phys.nwu.edu
(847) 467-7099
Fermilab
Northwestern
SLAC
  • -/-/03:
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2.12. Investigation of Linear Collider Control System Requirements and Architecture
accelerator
FY 2003: $0
Gerry Abrams
GSAbrams@lbl.gov
(510) 486-7188
LBNL
SLAC
  • -/-/03:
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2.15. Investigation of acoustic localization of rf cavity breakdown
accelerator
FY 2003: $9,032
George Gollin
g-gollin@uiuc.edu
(217) 333-4451
Illinois
SLAC
  • 2/22/03: Undergraduates Rachel Hillmer, Michael Davidsaver, and Joe Calvey started working with Mike Haney and me in mid-January. We have a pair of copper dowels, on loan from Harry Carter (he runs the NLC structure facility at Fermilab) to investigate the attenuation of high frequency acoustic waves in heat-treated copper. (One of our dowels has been heat treated so that the grain size is similar to the wavelengths we're working with.) We've borrowed a pair of 2.25 MHz transducers from Bill O'Brien, a professor in the Illinois Dept. of Electrical Engineering who is collaborating with us. We're beginning to work on a Matlab finite element model of the copper-transducer system to see if we can understand our observations and then predict the acoustic properties of a short length of NLC rf structure that Mark Ross has loaned us. We're using a nice labview setup to read signals from a dual channel scope card that lives in a PC in the lab. The use of water as a coupling agent between the transducers and metal surfaces means that there are puddles all over the place. It is great fun, and the students are doing a terrific job. We would be glad to receive some funds for hardware-- the scope card is meant for testing CLEO trigger electronics, and the transducers are on loan to us.
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2.17. RF Cavity Diagnostics, Design, and Acoustic Emission Tests
accelerator
FY 2003: $23,480
Lucien Cremaldi
cremaldi@phy.olemiss.edu
(662) 915-5311
Mississippi
  • 2/22/03: The acoustic emissions has caught some attention. Mark tells me he has a 28 channel readout unit with sensors which is used in diagnosing RF cavity problems at SLAC. You have made a good start on the problem at UofI. I thought about taking some of Mark's data and having a student analyse it. I believe they have summer students, but during the other 9mos it receives less attention.

    I don't see any point in duplication of effort though. The signal condtioning channels are somewhat expensive, as are the transducers. I am less eager about this project. You should try to set up a system. If I am interested I will as Mark to send me some of his data, or even go to SLAC.

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2.18. Control of Beam Loss in High-Repetition Rate High-Power PPM Klystrons
accelerator
FY 2003: $40,000
Mark Hess
mhess@psfc.mit.edu
(617) 253-8454
MIT
Mission Research Corp
  • 2/22/03: We (MIT group) have developed a simple model for beam loss based on a maximum current limit [1] for highly-bunched (point charge) periodic electron beams traveling in a perfectly conducting drift tube in the presence of a periodic permanent magnet (PPM) focusing field. The physics of the current limit is due to a transverse electrostatic interaction of the electron bunches with the surrounding conducting wall. This limit has been successfully applied in predicting the presence of beam loss in five PPM focusing klystrons: the 11.4 GHz SLAC klystrons in support of the NLC program, namely, the 50 MW XL-PPM [2,3], 75 MW XP-1 [2,3], 75 MW XP-3 [4], and the 5.7 GHz 50 MW [5] and 11.4 GHz 75 MW PPM-1 [6] klystrons developed by Toshiba/KEK and BINP/KEK, respectively, as part of the JLC program. We wish to improve our model by including the following effects: finite beam size, finite beam energy spread, internal bunch forces, realistic magnetic fields due to PPM pole pieces, and transverse RF-fields. With the assistance of MRC, we will compare the predictions of our model to PPM klystron simulations using the particle-in-cell code MAGIC 3D. Currently, we are working on the problem of including the finite bunch size into our model.

    [1] M. Hess and C. Chen, Phys. Lett. A 295, 305 (2002).
    [2] D. Sprehn, et al, in: Proceedings of 19th International Linac Conference, Argonne National Laboratory Report ANL-98/28, 1997, p. 689.
    [3] D. Sprehn, et al, in: H.E. Brandt (Ed.), Intense Microwave Pulses VII, SPIE Proc. 4301, (2000), p. 132.
    [4] SLAC Website http://www-project.slac.stanford.edu/lc/local/MAC/ OCT2001/ Caryotakis%20NLC%20KLYSTRON%20R.pdf
    [5] Y. H. Chin, et al, in: Proceedings of the 2001 Particle Accelerator Conference, edited by P. W. Lucas and S. Webber, (2001), p. 3792.
    [6] H. Matsumoto, et al, in: Proceedings of the 2001 Particle Accelerator Conference, edited by P. W. Lucas and S. Webber, (2001), p. 993.

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2.22. Investigation of Novel Schemes for Injection/Extraction Kickers
accelerator
FY 2003: $2,362
George Gollin
g-gollin@uiuc.edu
(217) 333-4451
Cornell
Fermilab
Illinois
  • 2/22/03: I am writing code to do some orbit tracing through the elements of a Fourier series kicker and to include the damping ring's tune parameters in the model. I am still very excited by the project and haven't found any show-stoppers yet. Tom Junk, a faculty colleague at Illinois, is thinking about details of the kicker cavities and their effects on beam polarization. So far so good!
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2.23. Ring-tuned, permanent magnet-based Halbach quadrupole
accelerator
FY 2003: $36,950
James Rosenzweig
rosen@physics.ucla.edu
(310) 206-4541
UCLA
Fermilab
  • 3/3/03: Prof. Rosenzweigís group at UCLA is collaborating with Jim Volk at Fermilab on development of an adjustable permanent-magnet-based hybrid known as the Halbach ring-tuned quad quadrupole. As a first step towards construction and test of this magnet, which is being evaluated for possible application in the NLC main linacs and damping rings, we have begun three-dimensional modeling of the design, as illustrated in the following figures. This modeling represents a qualitative step forward from the existing 2D simulations, and will be used to generate magnet sorting schemes that allow the tight tolerances demanded by the NLC during strength adjustment of the quads to be achieved. Construction of a prototype will proceed soon (pending funding) at UCLA, with testing planned at UCLA, FNAL and SLAC. This work is being performed in conjunction with UCLA-based development of ultra-high gradient (>350/T/m) permanent magnet low energy final focus systems for advanced accelerator and light source system; such magnets are also of interest in the context of LC final focus systems.

    (a) Rendered picture of Halbach ring-tuned permanent magnet-based hybrid quadrupole, from 3D magnetostatic simulation code RADIA.


    (b) Arrow plot of magnetic field in symmetry plane of the quadrupole.

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2.24. Radiation Damage to Permanent Magnets
accelerator
FY 2003: $14,990
Lucien Cremaldi
cremaldi@phy.olemiss.edu
(662) 915-5311
Mississippi
  • 2/22/03: I hired an undergrad to work on various things this semester. If I thought that any LCRD money was coming my way I would have him focus on this. Presently he is working on other kinds of projects.
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2.26. Proposal to Test and Revise Designs for Linac and Final Doublet Component Movers
accelerator
FY 2003: $50,000
David Warner
Warner@lamar.colostate.edu
(970) 491-1035
Colorado State
SLAC
  • 3/4/03: No progress on this project. We are in jeopardy of losing our technical infrastructure due to lack of agency support for R&D projects.
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2.27. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation
accelerator
FY 2003: $20,000
James Ellison
ellison@math.unm.edu
(505) 277-4613
New Mexico
  • 2/22/03: Warnock is continuing his work with Venturini on CSR in rings, and writing a long report on their work. He has also established a collaboration on single-pass CSR with Rui Li at JLab. They have made some progress on the formalism and numerical strategy for applying the Vlasov method to this problem. They have also discussed the cancellation of the Talman centrifugal space charge force in a general context, as analyzed recently by Li and Derbenev, and the question of whether the cancellation will have an impact on numerical work. Ellison has not done any CSR related work as he is finishing several other projects. He hopes to begin this summer.
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2.28. Simulation Study of Source Issues for the Linear Collider
accelerator
FY 2003: $80,500
Dan Amidei
amidei@umich.edu
(734) 764-3266
UCLA
Fermilab
Michigan
SLAC
  • 2/22/03: We have established UCLA Parmela and MatLab interface on our Linux system. GSRA Tom Schwarz has designed a model of the SLC/NLC injector through the first bunching cavity, and is benchmarking the simulation against the results of Curtoni and Jablonka (http://tesla.desy.de/new_pages/TESLA_Reports/2001/pdf_files/tesla2001-22-2.pdf). Our first open ended problem will be to test in detail the assumption that the SLC design will simply scale in time and frequency to the NLC design. Concurrently, undergrad Andrew Wagner is imbedding the histogramming routine PAW into the Parmela code, so that we can better study variances and distributions.
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2.33. A Compact Wakefield Measurement Facility
accelerator
FY 2003: $70,000
Kwang-Je Kim
kwangje@aps.anl.gov
(630) 252-4647
Argonne
Chicago
Fermilab
  • 2/22/03: The University of Chicago/ANL group has begun an initial exploration for a compact wakefield measurement facility. A new, 1.5 cell, L-band photocathode photocathode was recently installed at AWA ( Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Facility). Simulation study is carried out to see whether this gun is suitable for high-brightness operation. The result is very encouraging--it was found that the gun could indeed produce 1 nC, <2mm-mrad beams satisfying the requirements for testing the concept of wakefield measurement facility.
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2.35. Flat beam generation in Photocathode
accelerator
FY 2003: $20,689
Shyh-Yuan Lee
shylee@indiana.edu
(812) 855-7637
Fermilab
Indiana
LBNL
  • -/-/03:
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2.36. Advanced Beam Manipulations with RF quadrupoles
accelerator
FY 2003: $20,689
Shyh-Yuan Lee
shylee@indiana.edu
(812) 855-7637
Argonne
Indiana
  • -/-/03:
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2.37. Study of Polarized Positron Production for the LC
accelerator
FY 2003: $38,750
William Bugg
bugg@slac.stanford.edu
(865) 974-7799
South Carolina
SLAC
Tennessee
Princeton
  • 2/22/03: As you know we have a collaborative proposal to test an NLC positron polarization scheme at the FFTB at SLAC, a scheme which would be applicable to NLC at SLAC or to TESLA and JLC who are colaborating with us on the experiment. While not yet approved by EPAC design work is proceding at a good pace as the FFTB time schedule requires us to complete the experiment quickly. Tennessee's primary tasks are to provide silicon Tungsten calorimeters and to construct magnetized iron absorber magnets for this experiment (E-166). We are prepared to begin actual construction on these items as soon as funding is made available. It is crucial that we begin ASAP as the time window for phase I of the experiment requires us to begin installation and commissioning in fall of 2003. Any information you are able to obtain about timing of funding action will be of great use to us.
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3.1. A Fast Gas Cerenkov Calorimeter for Bunch-by-Bunch Luminosity Measurement at the Next Linear Collider
LEP
FY 2003: $16,000
John Hauptman
hauptman@iastate.edu
(515) 294-8572
Iowa State
SLAC
Texas Tech
  • 2/26/03:
    1. We are currently working on the simulation. Geant4 code is in progress. We have one graduate student (part-time ) and one undergraduate student (10 h/week) working on it. There are several important questions that will be answered by the detailed simulation. We hope that we will have some results for the summer meeting.
    2. We have designed and we are building 50ps light blinker that will be very useful for tests of the prototype of the calorimeter: ~50ps light pulse with cherenkov spectrum - similar to the one produced by EM shower in our calorimeter.
    3. the machinery for polishing metal shims to reach optical quality which is critical for this calorimeter, have been mostly done some time ago. However this activity was frozen since we don't have funds from DoE.
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3.2. R&D for luminosity monitor
LEP
FY 2003: $0
Yasar Onel
yasar-onel@uiowa.edu
(319) 335-1853
Fairfield
Iowa
  • 2/22/03: Developed some new ideas on this (proposal in to the DOE Advanced Detector Research).
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3.3. Energy Spectrometer Design Study for the Linear Collider Extraction Line
LEP
FY 2003: $10,000
(was $20,125)
Stan Hertzbach
hertzbach@physics.umass.edu
(650) 926-2507
U Mass.
  • 3/5/03: The student who was expected to work on this project while applying to graduate school took a 'real' job at MIT Lincoln Laboratory at the end of the year. Caleb Mills, an undergraduate, is wrapping up another project at UMass, and has recently starting on the spectrometer project. Caleb has been reading background material, but there is no progress to report. He will work on this project through CY 2003 as his Senior Honors Thesis.

    Given the change in personnel, our budget should be reduced to $10,000 to pay Caleb during the summer and for travel funds for him.

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3.4. Quartz fiber Cerenkov detector for precision beam energy spectrometer
LEP
FY 2003: $14,899
Eric Torrence
torrence@physics.uoregon.edu
(541) 346-4618
Oregon
  • -/-/03:
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3.6. Polarimetry at LC
LEP
FY 2003: $10,000
Yasar Onel
yasar-onel@uiowa.edu
(319) 335-1853
Fairfield
Iowa
Iowa State
  • 2/22/03: Taking part in bi-weekly meetings organized by M.Woods/SLAC. Mostly brainstorming, thinking and planning.
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3.7. Compton polarimeter backgrounds
LEP
FY 2003: $28,000
William Oliver
william.oliver@tufts.edu
(617) 627-5364
Tufts
  • 3/5/03: I have not started the project, but expect to start this month. I plan to attend the meeting in Cornell in July, and hope to have made some progress that I will be able to report there. I will work on the project with or without funding. If funding comes through, I would use it to hire a graduate student to help with the calculations in the summer.
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3.9. Development of thin, fast, radiation hard, 3d-electrode array, silicon radiation sensors
LEP
FY 2003: $23,517
Sherwood Parker
sher@slac.stanford.edu
(510) 841 2012
Hawaii
  • 2/22/03: Test results from the first completed 3D silicon sensor fabrication run have been summarized in the LCRD proposal, "Development of thin, fast, radiation hard, 3D-electrode array, silicon radiation sensors". References to the five publications giving details are also included in that proposal.

    With the recent availability of moderately fast, 0.25-micron, radiation hard amplifiers from the Jarron group at CERN, we have made preliminary pulse shape measurements, using a 90-Sr source, showing both rise and fall times of 3.5 ns. Actual sensor speeds are expected to be faster. Such pulses are shown in an article by Cinzia Da Via in the January 2003 CERN Courier. Further measurements with a setup having less noise and pickup are now underway.

    Additional measurements are planned using 0.13-micron amplifiers from the same group. They are now in fabrication and are expected to have rise and fall times of 1.5 ns. Such high speed sensors could be useful for a beam shape monitor designed to make separate measurements of successive linear collider beam buckets.

    A second 3D sensor fabrication run, with active-edge sensors, has been completed. These are sensors in which a boundary trench is made at the same time as the holes for one set of electrodes. The trench and holes are then filled with doped polycrystalline silicon, making the edge into an electrode. A final dicing etch is made part way through the trench, producing sensors that are expected to be active to within several microns of their physical edges. Tests have just started on these sensors.

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4.1. A Proposal for R&D on CCD Vertex Detectors for Future Linear e+ e- Colliders
vertexing
FY 2003: $50,000
Charlie Baltay
baltay@yalph2.physics.yale.edu
(203) 432-3386
Oregon
Yale
  • 2/28/03: Work is in progress at SLAC to remove the vertex detector from SLD. Performance measurements comparing the inner and outer layers should yield useful information concerning the effects of radiation damage.

    The group is also in the process of discussing a number of the technical issues with potential suppliers. There are matters concerning radiation hardness, readout speed, and the reduction of multiple scattering in the inner layer to be addressed. Engineering details associated with thinning and stretching chips in the innermost layer are under investigation.

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5.1. Development and Testing Linear Collider Forward Tracking
tracking
FY 2003: $39,422
Michael Strauss
mgstrauss@ou.edu
(405) 325-3961
Oklahoma
  • -/-/03:
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5.2. Evaluation of a GEM based Forward Tracking Prototype for the NLC
tracking
FY 2003: $37,490
Lee Sawyer
sawyer@phys.latech.edu
(318) 251-2407
Louisiana Tech
  • 3/3/03: LA Tech is proposing a hardware and software effort in its R&D project. The aim is to evaluate a GEM-based detector for forward tracking.

    On the hardware side, we are setting up a GEM lab and have ordered a triple GEM detector from Sauli at CERN. We expect it to arrive by summer. We will continue to work on GEMs independent of the NLC proposal, as there is interest in the medium energy group at LA Tech to use GEMs for tracking in the QWEAK experiment at Jefferson Lab.

    On the software side, we are still in the stage of installing and understanding how to run the NLC simulation package. We were charged by the review committee to work closely with Mike Strauss at Oklahoma, who is proposing to study various tracking algoritms in the forward region. Mike and I have met twice so far to discuss how to do this, once at the Arlington NLC workshop and again at a D0 collaboration meeting. We will not be able to make much headway on the simulations until we have funds for a student who can dedicate a significant amount of time to this.

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5.4. Fabrication and investigation of Gas Electron Multipliers for charged particle tracking
tracking
FY 2003: $0
Peter Fisher
fisherp@mit.edu
(617) 253-8561
MIT
NCA&T
  • -/-/03:
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5.5. Studies of the Use of Scintillating Fibers for an Intermediate Tracker which Provides Precise Timing and Bunch Identification
tracking
FY 2003: $39,500
Rick VanKooten
rvankoot@indiana.edu
(812) 855-2650
Fermilab
Indiana
Notre Dame
  • 2/26/03 Progress: First Monte Carlo studies of light collection and transmission through an intermediate layer of scintillating fiber to evaluate timing performance. Monte Carlo simulations of the impact of overlapping events on Higgs boson precision measurements continuing. Hardware work on cosmic ray test stand deferred until funding secured.
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5.9. Tracking Software Optimization for the Silicon Detector Option
tracking
FY 2003: $31,250
Milind Purohit
purohit@beauty.physics.sc.edu
(803) 777-6996
South Carolina
  • 2/22/03: I have talked to Achim Weidemann. He has learned how to run the LC MC Java version. Now he will begin learning how to extract hits and track information from it. Once he gets to that point, which will involve talking to local SLAC experts, he will then transfer that expertise to me and I will start working on track finding algorithms. That summarizes where we are at this point. I believe we should be making recognizable progress in a month or so.
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5.10. Use of Silicon Strip Detectors in Low Duty-Cycle Applications
tracking
FY 2003: $0
Bruce Schumm
schumm@scipp.ucsc.edu
(831)-459-3034
UC Santa Cruz
  • 3/4/03: UCSC LC R&D

    • Long shaping-time silicon readout (Funded thorugh DOE Advanced Detector R&D Program)

      We are looking into electronic and eleectro-mechanical issues relating to the development of reading out long (1-2 meter) silicon strip detector ladders with low (10^-2) duty cycle, while retaining good (7 um or better) resolution. We are currently bringing a complete pulse- development simulation up, including effects from diffusion, magnetic fields, instantaneous space-charge expansion, detector geometry, noise, and readout strategy. We will use this to optimize shaping time and readout architecture. We have also identified and tested silicon strip sensors to be used in developing a prototype long ladder. We expect to begin design and contruction of the ladder in April. We have also begin the exploration of the electrical engineering issues associated with cycling the power, and have begin an initial layout of several functions on the prototype chip. Although it's not up-to-date, a WEB reference from January 2003 can be found here.

    • SUSY signals in the forward direction

      With the backing of Tim Barklow at SLAC, we have been looking into the feasibility of reconstructing SUSY signals against Standard-Model backgrounds in the forward region, which we define to be between 100 and 650 mrad (between 0.8 and 0.995 in cos(theta)). So far, we have been working with Tim to ensure that Standard Model backgrounds are modelled appropriately for studies in this region, and have worked with Tim on identifying a number of refinements in the simulation. Work will probably intensify as the group increases from two (myself and a student) to four (three more students will be joining the project). The students that are involved are all undergraduate thesis students. A reference can be found here.

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6.2. Linear Collider Detector Development Proposal to Study and Develop Scintillator-Fiber Readout Scintillator Calorimetry with High Spatial Resolution
calorimetry
FY 2003: $54,484
Uriel Nauenberg
uriel@pizero.colorado.edu
(303) 492-7715
Colorado
  • 2/28/03: We have now simulated the performance of the calorimeter with the tiles offset. Here are the results:
    1. For 2 mm scintillator layers with 1/2Xo of Tungsten the energy resolution is 11%/sqrt(E) with a very small constant (for 40 layers). As the number of layers decreases to 35 and 30 the constant term increases substantially, probably due to leakage out the back. Leakage is 1.8% for 250 GeV Gammas for 40 layers and increases quickly as the number of layers decreases.
    2. We need to understand how this calorimeter performs for 500 GeV photons and 1 TeV photons. Very likely we will need to go to 45 layers which is roughly another 2 cm.
    3. The spatial resolution of the offset tiles is excellent. There are regions of the tiles where the dxdy resolution improves by as much as a factor of 40.
    4. We need to begin to study the overlap of photons in a shower environment for a given scintillator plate size.
    5. We are beginning to build a test bed to study the light collected when we collect the signals over 2-3 layers for minimum ionizing particles.
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6.4. Exploring Crystal Calorimetry for A Linear Collider Detector
calorimetry
FY 2003: $38,805
Usha Mallik
usha-mallik@uiowa.edu
(319) 335-0499
Caltech
Iowa
South Carolina
SLAC
UT Austin
  • 3/3/03: A new postdoc, Matthew Charles, who will work on BABAR as well as LC R&D has been hired at Iowa, and has just arrived at SLAC. Rafe Schindler has arranged a small area in a lab at SLAC where preliminary tests could begin. Ren-Yuan Zhu agreed to lend a couple of small PbW04 crystals. Soon, we hope to be able to start both with crystal testing and with MC simulation. [We do not yet know about the funding of our proposal.]
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6.5. Development of a silicon-tungsten test module for an electromagnetic calorimeter
calorimetry
FY 2003: $37,500
Raymond Frey
rayfrey@cosmic.uoregon.edu
(541) 346-5873
Oregon
SLAC
  • 2/22/03: We are moving forward with increasing speed on the detector R&D. We have weekly phone meetings with SLAC. We have designs, documentation, stuff going on in the lab, etc. We are about to receive bids on silicon detectors from vendors...

    ...and then we will be stuck, since we don't have money to buy them. In reality, we will have other things to work on, but funding will be the limiting factor soon if it doesn't arrive.

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6.6. Digital Hadron Calorimetry for the Linear Collider using GEM technology
calorimetry
FY 2003: $72,641
Andy White
awhite@uta.edu
(817) 272-2812
Argonne
Northern Illinois
UT Arlington
  • 2/22/03: At UTA we have been working on the development and simulation of GEM-based digital hadron calorimetry. Using (so far) a combination of local and ADR funding, we have built a prototype GEM chamber using GEM foils from CERN. We are currently understanding the operation of this chamber, working on noise reduction, and considering how to extend this knowledge to the design of a actual GEM active calorimeter layer. On the simulation side, we have installed Mokka and used it to study the response of the TESLA TDR design to pions. We then introduced a new driver for Mokka giving a description of a GEM-based active layer. We have obtained, and recently presented, results on the energy resolution from this simulation using GEM layers in the analog sense as a precursor to developing an energy flow/digital approach using our design. We have exhausted the local and ADR funding and need the LCRD and second round ADR funding (proposal submitted) to continue this work.
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6.12. Micro-machined Vacuum Photodetectors
calorimetry
FY 2003: $28,000
Yasar Onel
yasar-onel@uiowa.edu
(319) 335-1853
Fairfield
Iowa
  • 2/22/03: Micro-machined micro channel plates (requested funding for LC R&D; proposal in to the DOE Advanced detector Research).
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6.13. Cherenkov compensated calorimetry
calorimetry
FY 2003: $0
Yasar Onel
yasar-onel@uiowa.edu
(319) 335-1853
Fairfield
Iowa
Iowa State
  • 2/22/03: Borrowed CMS EM pre-production crystals ( matrix of 9 modules), I will take a part one of my old SSC detectors for the PMT's. I will try to test the concept at CERN test beam (if I can get in ) during the summer.
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6.14. Study of Resistive Plate Chambers as Active Medium for the HCAL
calorimetry
FY 2003: $50,100
Josť Repond
repond@hep.anl.gov
(630) 252-7554
Argonne
Boston University
Chicago
Illinois
  • 3/24/03: The purpose of this project is to develop a digital hadron calorimeter (DHCAL) using Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) as active medium. RPCs are ideally suited for such a calorimeter: they are simple in design, cheap to build, reliable and robust, and the readout can be segmented into small pads of say 1 cm2, as required for a DHCAL at the Linear Collider.

    Work on developing these chambers has already begun. Several chambers have been built and have been tested thoroughly with sources and cosmic rays. Tests with 25 pads of 1 cm2 each are ongoing. Furthermore, considerable effort is dedicated to the development of the readout system, a challenge by itself given the large number of channels, of order of 50x10^6 for the entire DHCAL.

    The project is being carried out by a collaboration of Argonne National Laboratory, Boston University, University of Chicago, and Fermilab. As a first major milestone, the collaboration aims at providing a 1 m3 prototype section for test beams in 2004/5.

    Tests with particle beams will validate both the technology and the detailed Monte Carlo simulations of hadronic showers. The results will provide a basis for the comparison of the performances of the analog and digital approach to hadron calorimetry.

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7.2. Scintillator Based Muon System R&D
muons
FY 2003: $57,710
Paul Karchin
karchin@physics.wayne.edu
(313) 577-5424
UC Davis
Fermilab
Northern Illinois
Notre Dame
Rice
Wayne State
UT Austin
  • 3/10/03: STATUS REPORT OF THE US SCINTILLATOR MUON DETECTOR COLLABORATION

    The Fermilab group has done simulation studies of single pion and muon signatures in the American SD muon detector, hadron and EM calorimeters and is developing muon identification algorithms based on these studies. They have confirmed previous muon studies on pion decays and punch-through by Marcello Piccolo that were reported during the Arlington workshop.

    The NIU and Fermilab groups have made light yield measurements of various types of scintillator read out by wavelength shifting fibers. Radioactive isotopes and cosmic rays were used as ionization sources.

    The Wayne State group has been learning to operate a MINOS-style multi-anode PMT.

    A scintillator extruder recently acquired by NIU/NICADD has arrived at Fermilab where it is being set-up at Lab-5. Preliminary tests at the manufacturers, Berstorff, near Covington, Kentucky were successful. Assembly of the extruder at Fermilab is progressing and it is expected in April '03 that first pieces of extruded plastic will be ready to test. Near term plans for the machine include setting up a program of production and testing a variety of extrusion profiles.

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7.4. Particle Identification and Software Infrastructure for Linear Collider Physics and Detector Studies
muons
FY 2003: $35,100
Robert Wilson
wilson@lamar.colostate.edu
(970) 491-5033
Colorado State
SLAC
  • 3/4/03: An effort is being made to "clean up" the code to make it more user friendly for non-experts. A new undergraduate student has begun learning the ropes; he is an experienced Java/C++ etc. programmer (in industry and an ongoing consulting business) and a quick physics study. If we get the LCRD funds he will be able to work during the summer.
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